Manor House 1690

Manor House 1690 | Chiromancy Tea Towel

8.00
manorhouse1690_crowland_lincolnshire_fens_antiques_places_to_visit_17thcentury_chiromancy_teatowel.jpg
manorhouse1690_crowland_lincolnshire_fens_antiques_places_to_visit_17thcentury_chiromancy_teatowel.jpg
manorhouse1690_crowland_lincolnshire_fens_antiques_places_to_visit_17thcentury_chiromancy_teatowel.jpg

Manor House 1690 | Chiromancy Tea Towel

8.00

Limited Edition tea towel, exclusive to Manor House 1690.  

Printed on 100% undyed cotton.

Palmistry, also known as chiromancy, is the art of interpreting lines on the hand to evaluate someone’s character or foretell their future. The history of palm reading is uncertain, but may have originated in India in Hindu astrology, and spread to China, Tibet, Persia, Egypt and Ancient Greece, at least partly through the traditional fortune-telling practices of the Romani people. After falling into disrepute due to its associations with magic and witchcraft during the middle ages, interest in palmistry saw a resurgence during the 17th century, when scholars began to attempt to find rational and scientific foundations for the practice.

This compelling 17th century woodcut illustration, which maps out the lines of the palm and their meanings, is from Jean Baptiste Belot’s Les Ouevres, published in Rouen around 1640. Belot was a French Renaissance chiromancer, whose studies in palm reading were deeply influenced by physiognomy and astrology, assigning astrological and zodiacal significance to various parts of the hands and fingers.  

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Limited Edition tea towel, exclusive to Manor House 1690.  

Printed on 100% undyed cotton.

Palmistry, also known as chiromancy, is the art of interpreting lines on the hand to evaluate someone’s character or foretell their future. The history of palm reading is uncertain, but may have originated in India in Hindu astrology, and spread to China, Tibet, Persia, Egypt and Ancient Greece, at least partly through the traditional fortune-telling practices of the Romani people. After falling into disrepute due to its associations with magic and witchcraft during the middle ages, interest in palmistry saw a resurgence during the 17th century, when scholars began to attempt to find rational and scientific foundations for the practice.

This compelling 17th century woodcut illustration, which maps out the lines of the palm and their meanings, is from Jean Baptiste Belot’s Les Ouevres, published in Rouen around 1640. Belot was a French Renaissance chiromancer, whose studies in palm reading were deeply influenced by physiognomy and astrology, assigning astrological and zodiacal significance to various parts of the hands and fingers.